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Elder Law

Tuesday, February 6, 2018

Revising Your Will Based on Changes in Law and Changes in Facts


It is important to revisit your documents at least once every 5 years. As the tax law changes constantly, the documents created in the past may no longer be the most efficient ones. As your family situation changes, your Will may become completely outdated.

Changes in Law

In the past, estate tax threshold used to be $1MM. Anything above that amount would be taxed at 40%.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

How to Help Dementia Patients Sleep Better With a Bedtime Routine


How to Help Dementia Patients Sleep Better With a Bedtime Routine

Sleep routines are essential for maintaining healthy sleep habits. This is true at any age and ability, but especially for dementia patients.
Read more . . .


Wednesday, November 29, 2017

How to make a statement after you are dead

Most people want to leave a legacy. Yet most people also have no idea how to go about doing it.  One simple way is through a life insurance policy.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Imagine your family at peace: How to Have Crucial Conversations with Your Loved Ones about End-of-Life issues


Talking about end of life issues with a loved one who is already sick is difficult. Your loved one may not be thinking clearly, may be in pain, and everyone is likely to be very emotional. That’s why it’s important to have this conversation early, while everyone is thinking clearly. A plan is likely to be empowering for all involved.

A parent may be resistant to receiving care and having crucial conversations with you because she is afraid of losing her way of life, losing privacy, getting old, not having sufficient financial assets, being a burden, having her money taken away from her, being thrown into a nursing home and dying.


Read more . . .


Friday, September 15, 2017

Should you hire an aide privately or through an agency?


According to recent research by the AARP, about 90 percent of seniors would like to stay in their own home as they age, even if they require day-to-day assistance with activities of daily living. With a rapidly increasing senior population, demand for quality in-home care is beginning to skyrocket.

In the past, in-home care was usually delivered by home care agencies, who would provide a home care aide, and take care of the back-end reporting and financial requirements. However, the cost structure is beginning to shift.

First, cases involving cognitive decline, such as Alzheimer’s disease, usually require round the clock care.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, July 11, 2017

If you plan on growing old, the Medicaid debate affects you!


One in three people who turn 65 end up in a nursing home. No one ever wants to go there, yet most of the time the family has no choice about this issue (it becomes dangerous to keep the person at home, the daily care required is too much for a home care aide, etc). 

In New York and in New Jersey nursing home now costs $15-$20K a month! The vast majority of people cannot pay this bill on their own, especially after years of retirement spending. Even if the person wants to stay at home, an average home care bill is $10-$12K a month, which, for most people is also unaffordable based on Social Security pensions and retirement savings.

Currently, Medicaid pays for home care and nursing home care.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Medicare does not pay for home care!


Even though some seniors may be entitled to home care through their Medicare benefits, it may be impossible for them to receive this needed care.

And that is why most people plan for Medicaid - not because they are trying to cheat the system, but because they have no other real choice. 

 

http://www.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Is an Irrevocable Trust really that Irrevocable?

The word “Irrevocable” usually implies no ability to change. Most people believe that the Trustee is required to adhere to the wishes of the Trust’s creator, even though the times and circumstances have changed. Nonetheless, that is no longer true in the case of New York State.

There are two circumstances where an Irrevocable Trust may be changed or revoked.

The first circumstance exists when the Grantor of the Trust is still alive, wants to make a change and ALL the beneficiaries of the Trust agree with the proposed change.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, February 14, 2017

Main Reasons Why Families Fight Over Estates

1. Location of Siblings. It is often the case that one sibling provides care and support for an aging parent, while other siblings are distant (either physically or psychologically). While the local sibling provides support, that same sibling may also control the parent’s finances. The same sibling may also bring the parent to an attorney to get his affairs in order.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Financial Crimes Against the Elderly


Elderly people are vulnerable to fraud and financial abuse. The reasons are multiple: isolation, weakening mental and physical condition, memory loss and lack of knowledge about today's markets and technology.
According to New York State Elder Abuse Prevalence Study, only 1 out of 44 cases of financial abuse Is reported, usually because the victim is too ashamed to report the incident. Even in 2010, an estimated cost of financial exploitation against the seniors was $2.9 billion.

Read more . . .


Tuesday, August 2, 2016

Who will care for my dog?


When a couple owns a pet, the owners can assume that the survivor will continue caring for their pet (although that’s not necessarily true, at least in my own situation). What happens when a single person owns a pet? In 49 states (Minnesota is the only state that does not permit this) you can now create a pet trust.

A pet trust permits the grantor to set aside a certain amount of money to care for the pet upon the owner’s disability or death. The trustee of the trust will make regular payments to the pet caregiver. The grantor can make specific instructions regarding the care of the pet, including shelter, feeding and veterinary care.
Read more . . .


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