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Asset Protection

Tuesday, December 18, 2018

What to Know About Tax Implications of Buying, Owning, and Selling Cryptocurrency


 

Buying, owning and selling virtual currency is all subject to the IRS supervision and must be recorded and reported properly to avoid severe tax penalties.

1.      Characteristics: Virtual currencies are treated as property, as opposed to currency for federal income tax purposes. As a result, basic tax principles applicable to property transactions also apply to Bitcoin transactions.


2.
Read more . . .


Friday, September 28, 2018

Snowbirds? Consider differences in State Law

If you spend some time in New York and some time in Florida, you may wish to consult your accountant about determining your domicile (as, depending on the answer, you will owe very different taxes). You may also think about consulting with two different local attorneys regarding your estate planning, as both New York and Florida have real differences in Will execution formalities, asset and homestead protection, Health Care and Power of Attorney languages, Medicaid eligibility rules and estate taxes. Consider this non-exclusive list of differences:


Read more . . .


Thursday, January 11, 2018

Simple Steps You Can Take Now to Protect Your Assets


As discussed in the previous article, there are very few of your assets that are protected from creditors in the event of a lawsuit. There are some simple steps that you can take to address your asset’s vulnerability to attacks by creditors.

  1. Buy insurance. You should have a liability insurance policy on your car, on your home, on your business, and an umbrella policy.

  2. Review ownership of assets.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, January 3, 2018

What Assets are Protected from Creditors?

Regardless of the President that is sitting in the Oval Office, the litigious nature of our society is not going to change.  There are many instances in which a client can be sued, including but not limited to: injuring someone in a car accident, being sued for malpractice, involvement in a business dispute, or owning a rental property in which someone was injured.

Certain assets are exempt from creditors as a matter of public policy:


Read more . . .


Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Medicare does not pay for home care!


Even though some seniors may be entitled to home care through their Medicare benefits, it may be impossible for them to receive this needed care.

And that is why most people plan for Medicaid - not because they are trying to cheat the system, but because they have no other real choice. 

 

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Read more . . .


Friday, August 26, 2016

Why would you want a Nevada Trust?


New York has a very strong policy against self-settled trusts. A self-settled trust is one where the Grantor transfers assets to an irrevocable trust but remains one of the Trust’s beneficiaries. While these transfers are legal, New York believes that they are “void as against creditors”. As a result, if the Grantor remains a beneficiary of this type of Trust in New York, his assets are not protected against creditors.

Nevada, however, together with approximately 12 other states, permits these types of trusts and protects the assets against creditors.
Read more . . .


Wednesday, March 23, 2016

How to monetize an investment real estate property while minimizing taxes

There are many reasons why one would want to withdraw money from an investment real estate. Some of these reasons include: no longer willing to manage the property, no longer needing the income tax benefit, desiring liquidity or desiring diversification in one’s investments.

1. The easiest way of monetizing a real estate property is selling it. However, with a sale come a host of costs. These costs include brokerage fees and income taxes (both federal and state). Depending on the level of appreciation and on prior depreciation deductions, the gain can be quite substantial and may result in a net amount received that is significantly less than the sale price.

2. There are methods of minimizing the income taxes on the sale of the property. These methods include:

           a.    An installment sale. This is a method of sale where at least one payment occurs after the year in which the disposition took place. Under this method, gain is not taxed when the disposition occurs, gain is recognized gradually as the payments are received.

           b. Borrowing against the property. If one wants to create liquidity while retaining ownership of the property, one can borrow against it. There are no tax consequences to this method. Cash can be used for other purposes.

            c. Like-kind exchange under 1031. This method provides a tax-deferral mechanism. No federal gain or loss is recognized where a real estate property held for use in a trade or business or for investment is exchanged for another “like-kind” property. There are several specific steps that must be taken to qualify for the exemption under section 1031. 

            d. Contributing property to a Charitable Remainder Trust (“CRT”). If one is at least somewhat charitably inclined, one can contribute property to this trust, where specified payments are made to a non-charitable beneficiary for a number of years and the remainder goes to charity. There are many tax advantages to this transaction, the main one being that upon a sale of the property by the CRT, no federal income taxes are due.

 

Disclaimer: This article only offers general information.  Each situation is unique. It is always helpful to talk to a specialized attorney, to figure out your various options and ramifications of actions.  As every case has subtle differences, please do not use this article for legal advice. Only a signed engagement letter will create an attorney-client relationship. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING


Sunday, February 14, 2016

A Third of Americans Spend Their Entire Inheritance Within Two Years!

A researcher at Ohio State University found that Americans who receive an inheritance save about half of it and spend, donate or lose the rest. However, almost 30% of Americans who receive the inheritance had negative savings rate within 2 years of receiving the inheritance, meaning that they spent it all.

There are strong similarities in these spending habits with people who receive lottery winnings. Apparently, lottery winners save only 16 cents of every dollar won and have dramatically higher bankruptcy rates within 5 years after winning.

Of course, the inheritance that people receive may not be a large amount of money. The median inheritance for the past 30 years was $11,340. For those people who inherit $100,000 or more, the percentage of people who spent it all within two years dropped to 19%.

If you receive an inheritance (or a lottery winning) – be careful. I’ve seen bad financial advisors who have only their own interests at heart. I’ve also seen bad “friends” who convince unsophisticated people to invest in their ‘brilliant’ business schemes. There is no perfect answer about what to do with the money. But not spending it immediately would probably be the best advice!

 

Disclaimer: This article only offers general information.  Each situation is unique. It is always helpful to talk to a specialized attorney, to figure out your various options and ramifications of actions.  As every case has subtle differences, please do not use this article for legal advice. Only a signed engagement letter will create an attorney-client relationship. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING


Monday, November 30, 2015

What is Long Term Care Insurance and New York State Partnership for Long Term Care

Many seniors are not aware that Medicare does not pay for custodial long term care. An individual suffering from Alzheimer’s disease or dementia, which requires assistance with feeding, bathing, and taking oral medications will not be covered by Medicare not by a Medigap insurance. The only way of paying for custodial long term care are: private payments, Medicaid, or Long Term Care Insurance.

Long term care: this is care that can be provided in the home, in a nursing home or in an assisted living facility. Eligibility for benefits is based on medical necessity as evidenced by an individual’s inability to perform a specified number of personal functions (activities of daily living): bathing, toileting, dressing, self-feeding, lack of mobility or loss of cognitive capacity.

Home Care: Most long term care insurance policies have a home care component. It is usually beneficial for an elderly person to continue to reside at home: familiar surroundings, familiar people and familiar foods provide comfort and control. The long term care insurance policy can pay for the number of hours required by the patient. This is a large improvement over Medicaid: individuals relying on public programs (Medicaid) frequently find that the number of hours authorized may be significantly less than what is required for the individual’s health and safety.

Coverage Provisions: These vary, depending on the need and the willingness to pay. In New York, a policy must offer at least 24 consecutive months of coverage. Each policy generally provides for a specified payment level, based on whether care is received at home, in an assisted living facility or in a nursing home. If the cost of care exceeds the policy benefit, the full benefit will be paid. If the cost of care is lower than policy benefit, the actual cost will be paid. Most policies contain a deductible, usually measured in days. The benefit period can be as short as two years, and as long as the life of the insured, with everything in between.

Exclusions: certain conditions are excluded by long term care insurance policies. These are, among others: alcoholism and drug additions, attempted suicide or intentionally self-inflicted injuries, mental and nervous disorders (except Alzheimer’s disease or demonstrable organic brain disease).

New York State Partnership for Long Term Care

These are specific long term care insurance policies approved by the New York Partnership policy.

Under a Total Asset Protection plan, the insurance policy will pay for the first three years nursing home care or six years of home care or a combination of the above (where two home care days are equal to one nursing home day). Individuals who have received these specified Partnership long term insurance benefits may apply for Medicaid and be eligible without regard to the value of their assets. Individuals may sell, transfer spend or retain assets, before during and after applying for Medicaid nursing home care – the penalty period does not apply. However, the Medicaid income levels will still be applied.

The policy premiums depend on age and coverage chosen. The Partnership policies are generally slightly more expensive than other policies. Annual premiums for a basic policy can range from $2,800 for a 40 year old to $13,000 for an 80 year old. However, the benefit is the ability to apply for Medicaid without transferring assets. All aspects must be considered and analyzed before a decision is made.

Disclaimer: This article only offers general information.  Each situation is unique. It is always helpful to talk to a specialized attorney, to figure out your various options and ramifications of actions.  As every case has subtle differences, please do not use this article for legal advice. Only a signed engagement letter will create an attorney-client relationship. ATTORNEY ADVERTISING.


Tuesday, May 12, 2015

Is asset protection a necessary part of estate planning?

Why estate planning: In general, there are many reasons why people engage in estate planning. Those include: death time tax mitigation, avoidance of probate, smooth transition of property at death, and making sure the deceased’s dispositive wishes are followed. Asset protection is an additional aspect of estate planning, which safeguards the assets from the risks they would otherwise be subject to.

What is asset protection: The goal of asset protection is generally to deter litigation. At the same time, the plan must be flexible enough to provide options to the client and to change over time in response to changing laws.  However, asset protection will not aid the client in the avoidance of taxes and it will not aid the client in the fraudulent hiding of assets.

Timing is crucial. There is no one particular planning tool that will aid every client in protecting the assets. Every situation is unique. The main lesson, however, applies to everyone: planning must be done in advance of litigation. Protecting or transferring assets after there are claims, may expose the client and the attorney to criminal and civil liability.

What one can be sued for: In general, one can never be sure what one will be sued for. If a person is a sole proprietor, then he can be sued for his business. If there is a corporation or an LLC, the corporate veil can be pierced. If one is a general partner, the partnership’s debts may cause personal issues. And generally, there is a “deep pocket syndrome” in America, where lawyers often base their analysis on whether the opposing party can pay a judgment.

Tools of asset protection: Gifting, joint ownership, insurance, corporations, family limited partnerships, domestic trusts, foreign trusts.

Result of asset protection: The client will divest himself of assets and still retain a degree of control over the property. As a result, if  / when in the future a cause of action accrues, there will be little incentive for the opposing side to sue, because there will be little or no assets to pursue.

Disclaimer: This article only offers general information.  Each situation is unique. It is always helpful to talk to a specialized attorney, to figure out your various options and ramifications of actions.  As every case has subtle differences, please do not use this article for legal advice. Only a signed engagement letter will create an attorney-client relationship.


Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Taking family dynamics into consideration, or thinking of expected family issues when planning!

When drafting a testamentary or an estate plan, one always should always consider family dynamics in order to preserve family relationships.

Parents may have several concerns about their children: entitlements, sibling rivalry, children’s spouses, safeguard from malpractice actions, and safeguard from drug abuse.

Entitlements: for parents of younger or minor children, the parents may not know what the children are going to be like when they grow up. It is up to the parents to build in incentives into their estate plan, so that the child graduates college, gets a career, waits until a certain age to get married, etc. One must be careful of entitlements that are against ‘public policy’ as those may be found void by the courts. Explicitly racist bequests (i.e. no money if she marries a Chinese) will not be upheld.

Sibling rivalry: most parents should be concerned about sibling rivalry. Once the parent is gone, the glue that held the family together may be gone as well.  A typical parent usually names the older child as the trustee or an executor of the trust, despite the feeling of ill-will that this nomination may cause. One method to avoid the rivalry may be to name a third party executor or a trustee.  This way the children may actually unite against a common enemy, who is not distributing the assets fast enough (in their opinion).

If the parent has left different provisions to children, it is imperative that the parent have a conversation with the children about his plan prior to his own demise. It is unfair to all siblings involved, if the disinherited child will find out about his disinheritance from the other siblings. In addition to feelings of resentment against the parent, the disinherited child may also suspect the other siblings in coercing the parent into doing what was done, and may start litigating.

Spouses of the Children:  parents usually want to leave bequests to their children and grandchildren, but not necessarily to the spouses of their children. Bequests to spouses may either be specifically avoided, or restricted, such that if the spouse divorces the child, the bequest will terminate.

Protection from malpractice action: A lot of the trusts that are now set up are done to protect the beneficiaries from creditor actions. The trust can be structured in a way that permits the beneficiary to enjoy the assets but not to technically own them.

Protection from drug abuse: if the parent is concerned about a child who has a drug, alcohol or gambling problem, naming a third party trustee is almost a necessity. The trust may also permit a trustee to engage in periodic testing of the child, and to stop making any payments to the child, in full discretion of the trustee. The goal is to provide for the child’s basic needs (shelter, food, clothing), and potential rehabilitation, without supporting the problem.

Disclaimer: This article only offers general information.  Each situation is unique. It is always helpful to talk to a specialized attorney, to figure out your various options and ramifications of actions.  As every case has subtle differences, please do not use this article for legal advice. Only a signed engagement letter will create an attorney-client relationship.


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